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Sales Lead Management Association Radio

18
Apr

How to Use Science to Develop Qualified Leads

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Ask a salesperson what they need from marketing and they will say, more sales leads.  Give them more and the next time you talk to them they will say you misunderstood them and they need more qualified sales leads.  In this SLMA Radio program we speak with Ben Sardella, co-founder and chief revenue officer from Datanyze about how a marketing department can make good on its promise of creating qualified leads by using technology.
 
About Ben Sardella
As co-founder and chief revenue officer, Ben oversees Datanyze's daily sales, marketing and business development operations. Before Datanyze, Ben served as VP of sales at Kissmetrics and started his career at NetSuite, where he pioneered the SaaS sales process. Ben is currently a mentor and advisor for a number of successful startups including Yesware and LaunchPad LA.  
 
About Datanyze
Datanyze is an all-in-one sales intelligence platform helping business uncover, research and reach the right prospects at the right time. Our software drives qualified leads, builds pipeline and increases overall revenue for hundreds of leading companies including Marketo, DoubleDutch and Oracle. http://www.datanyze.com/

For media, analyst, and speaking inquiries, please contact Sam Laber at sam@datanyze.com

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This episode is generously sponsored by adView.cfm?id=383The Vanella Group, Inc.-- the only firm that delivers telebased lead generation programs exclusively for enterprise technology providers. To learn more, visit VanellaGroup.com or call 888-335-0340


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20
Feb

Data is not truth, but it’s being sold as the truth.

Watch Now:
A gift from Linda to help you get started:


MYTH 4: Privacy is dead because we share and don't care:

79% of consumers care deeply about privacy.
But they have no way to know how they can control it.
Some of us are forced to be on Facebook to stay in touch with friends and family.
It's a compelling thing you have to do. You have ZERO control.

If you say no to the rules, you are OUT. So you either say, "no" and have no access, or you say, "yes" to participate and share. Even with your profile locked down, Facebook is still collecting your data even though you hide it from the rest of the world.


KNOW THIS: DATA IS NOT TRUTH, but it's being sold as the truth.

"You can predict what the average man will do with certainty, but you can't predict what the individual will do."
They share, but they also share stuff that has nothing to do with their real life. Perhaps it's research for a client, or something you were into for a moment after watching a movie, but then moved on. It's not accurate - it does not take into account our continuous evolution of interests.

Why should we care?

People share, but we have to be really respectful of that from a brand and reputation management view.
What we do with this trusted data can really destroy our relationships.
Consumers DO care, they feel they have no control over the data they share and then they rely on trusting that they are going to be smart by selective of whom they share information with. But how well do these selected companies protect what the consumer trusts them with?

All of our physical devices being connected to the internet - personal and moved to cloud. This is the central issue of our time as it relates to privacy and security. Know that the FTC is making this a high priority.

Myth 5: If it's in the cloud, I have a login and it's safe.

What is your doing at rest? What about in transit? Transit is typical, but confirm about it at rest.
When is it encrypted? The biggies are: Dropbox, Google Drive, and Box.
In the last 12-18 months, since the Snowden debacle, they are all encrypting their data at rest. It was already encrypted in transit.

Our government doesn't want us to encrypt our data. They want to be able to subpoena these records and have easy access to the data. They prefer not to decrypt. Really keep a brief eye on what is going on in Congress on this. If the laws come down that we cannot encrypt our data, it puts our customers at risk and our businesses at risk for breaches. We need a balance to this approach. We all need to participate in this conversation and give feedback to our elected officials. Lying back to await the outcome is unacceptable.

Cellphones have the same issue. Apple's new IOS is encrypted. The FBI is petitioning Congress to make this illegal.
If the government can hack it, so can our competitors, employees and other governments.
Make sure your 3rd party cloud vendors disclose to you what their security measures are.


About Linda Zimmer:  LinkedIn Google+ | Twitter

Today's world is a digital one. That means being effective online if you want great business outcomes. Connecting with customers and offering value builds business.She's clocked more than 20 years in creating and managing digital marketing strategies to engage with people and trigger action. And she's loved every second of my relationships and collaboration with corporate, nonprofit, and government organizations.

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23
Jan

3 Myths About Securing Data From Podcasts to Posts to Coffee Houses

Watch Now:

A gift from Linda to help you get started:

It's not just about IT, Password protections, McAfee, Norton, Firewalls and the like. It starts with what comes out of your MOUTH.

You can scroll below to watch it here,
or watch the replay on YouTube, here.

Linda Zimmer is a certified privacy manager by the International Association of Privacy Professionals. She is also the President of MarCom|Interactive - specialize in digital marketing
The biggest myth:
It's all about technology and we have to be paranoid and pour a ton of resources into our it security.
Data breaches come from a lot of different areas within the business.
It's a brand issue, a reputation issue and a financial issue.
The IAPP makes several certifications available. Linda encourages ANYONE wanting to embellish your career.

A question we need to ask is: How do we operationalize security and privacy within our organizations?
The answer to this will help you develop the processes across the organization
It will create a culture of security and privacy throughout the organization.
It's a big hit in the decision of how they shop and where they shop.
It isn't just a marketing thing. If marketing and sales don't have at least a degree of this knowledge, it's difficult to weave into your online plans, marketing strategies.
It gives you bird's eye view of the organization.

Probably using some CRM or SalesForce - very silo-ed, this is the information they own. BUT they may use it to transact and record financial transactions which means that credit card info resides within the CRM so there is overlap with finance and sales. 
Sales has the most access to the most important asset a company has: their customer database. It is all connected. Where does our data sit, where is it stored and what happens to it when it's on the move.

Myth 1:

Hacking is the number one way data is breached.

Truth:

40% of all data breaches come from employee mistakes, stolen laptops, negligence with sign-ons, flash drives, external storage.

25% comes from hackers.

Myth 2

Data security is the job of IT

Be careful when you purchase data, Check the reputation, ask the security questions. 
Be careful when you do a friend a favor by sharing data. It may be with good intentions, but that data you share, may get commingled with other data and then possibly, that gets sold or hacked. Did you have the permission to SHARE that information with any other company? Do not betray your customers and lists.
Be aware of HIPA compliance. This is the number one thing hackers want: Medical Records for medical identity theft. If you work with a company who has to follow this compliance, you need to as well. They should require it of you, as well.
Consultants and marketing firms:

We can be held LIABLE for who we hire to handle data.

Takeaway:

Need to review the contracts you have with your vendors and be sure that your contact obligates them to follow all of the data and privacy laws. That will go a long with the regulators. The FTC is broadening their scope. There are about two dozen guidelines we have to all be compliant with.

Social engineering is the way our data is compromised most frequently.
Someone using known, easily available information to defeat your security systems and protocols.
Security analysts love to go into a company and say, "I can hack into your company."
A security expert, Chris Hadnagy, comes in to pitch a CEO of a large firm. CEO is complacent and brags about how tough their IT dept. is on security, it's all locked down, etc. Presenting guy accepts this with a wry smile. He leaves and proceeds to look up public information about the CEO. He finds out his favorite team, learns he's a cancer survivor who promotes a specific charity and goes into action...
He calls the CEO pretending to be from that charity. He asks for a donation and says that for this campaign only, if he makes a donation they are giving donors pair of tickets to - get this - a game played by his favorite sports team! WOW ! How fortuitous... It gets better.
Then, the fake caller (sales guy demonstrating how easy it is to hack into their company) says he wants to send this CEO a flyer with the info. He want to make sure the CEO can view it in his version of Acrobat Reader and asks him which version. The CEO gives the information gladly and the fake charity guy emails him a PDF. The PDF when opened, launched malware that grabs all access to all network computers the CEO can access and all of his passwords since the fake charity guy knew which version of Acrobat - it told him which operating system, too.  He knew where to hunt for the digital keys to the company. 
This sales guy was making a point, but you can see how easy it is to get information through a seemingly innocent conversation. BE CAREFUL what you tell to strangers. A stranger is someone that you would not invite to your house for a BBQ. They are not an acquaintance. You don't know them, their face, or if they are whom they say they are!
These are the NEFARIOUS folks. Don't let them in. 

About Linda Zimmer:  LinkedIn Google+ | Twitter


Today's world is a digital one. That means being effective online if you want great business outcomes. Connecting with customers and offering value builds business.She's clocked more than 20 years in creating and managing digital marketing strategies to engage with people and trigger action. And she's loved every second of my relationships and collaboration with corporate, nonprofit, and government organizations.